Monthly Archives: September 2009


POLITICS – HK Time Out Magazine – Column #12

I’m currently contributing a short, light-hearted political column to Hong Kong Time Out Magazine. Below is the uncut, original version of my latest piece…

‘Green shoots’
Greenpeace won’t be happy with how I learned to stop worrying and love the skyscraper, but Hong Kong’s super high density set-up is actually a very economical model. Our compact living arrangements minimise the impact on the local environment, which is over 70% countryside, giving us one of the highest proportions of national park reserves in the world. It means almost everyone is well-connected to public transport, it quashes the need for car ownership, enables local economies and makes commuting to the supermarket an outlandish idea. One local blogger calculated that only 0.15% of the world’s land mass would be urbanised if everyone were to live, as he does, on an 18,000 person housing estate. Plus, efficient living needn’t denote a bleak and claustrophobic existence, as most land would be left to nature or for public use.


POLITICS – HK Time Out Magazine – Column #11

I’m currently contributing a short, light-hearted political column to Hong Kong Time Out Magazine. Below is the uncut, original version of my latest piece…

Mainland meddling.
Show up to any protest vaguely involving China and you’ll spot dark clothed men murmuring in Putonghua with earpieces and shaved heads – the mainland undercover police ‘goons’ stick out worse than Donald Tsang’s spottiest bowtie. They suspiciously eye you up as if you’d just killed their cat – though, I hardly blend in either, being a pale, ginger-haired beacon of gweilo tallness (somehow we both like to think we go undetected!)


POLITICS – HK Time Out Magazine – Column #10

I’m currently contributing a short, light-hearted political column to Hong Kong Time Out Magazine. Below is the uncut, original version of my latest piece…

In bed with the Junta

China may have begun to distance itself from the wacky regime in North Korea, but its support of the detestable Burmese junta hasn’t missed a beat. India, China and Hong Kong have too many vested interests at stake to have joined the international chorus of condemnation when democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi was sentenced this month. It should come as no surprise that China’s Foreign Ministry simply said that the world must ‘fully respect Myanmar’s judicial sovereignty’.