Monthly Archives: March 2010


POLITICS – HK Time Out Magazine – Column #24

I’m currently contributing a short, light-hearted political column to Hong Kong Time Out Magazine. Below is the uncut, original version of my latest piece…

Mind the Gap
Our city can boast many superlatives – most expensive housing rental market, largest collection of skyscrapers and highest per-capita orange consumption to name a few. One achievement to be more embarrassed about though, is the fact that the city of superlatives has the widest income gap of any other rich nation.


POLITICS – HK Time Out Magazine – Column #23

I’m currently contributing a short, light-hearted political column to Hong Kong Time Out Magazine. Below is the uncut, original version of my latest piece…

Making Waves
When it comes to international climate policy, HK is in the convenient position of being able to hide behind China’s developing country status and exemption from Kyoto Protocol cuts. Yet the most recent data suggests we produce a monstrous 29 tonnes per capita – more than the US or China and second only to Luxembourg. And as embarrassing as it is to lose to such a relentlessly bland country, this is not something HK should be getting competitive about.


ACTIVISM – 51st Anniversary of the Tibetan Occupation, Hong Kong 3

On March 13th, 2010, I joined Christina Chan at the China Liaison Office in Hong Kong to protest the continued occupation of Tibet. The police presence was around 4:1 for each protester, around double last year‘s ratio. The following photos are from the local press, scroll down for video.

 

Activists hold vigil to mark Tibet riots
South China Morning Post, Mar 14, 2010

About 20 people held a candle-light vigil last night outside the central government’s liaison office to mark the riots in Tibet two years ago.


POLITICS – HK Time Out Magazine – Column #22

I’m currently contributing a short, light-hearted political column to Hong Kong Time Out Magazine. Below is the uncut, original version of my latest piece…

Gweilo Gripes
“Why do you care?” I must’ve been asked it hundreds of times at various protests over the last few years, and in particular during last month’s Rail Link rallies. Much to my embarrassment, fellow activists seem bewildered, impressed and even flattered that some gweilo is rocking up to a local demo – and it’s often a Kodak moment. My response is that we aliens are also tax-payers and stakeholders in HK society. Our voice deserves to be heard, especially after living here for a few years – ex-pats needn’t feel they have to leave their political conscience at home. However, not all causes I choose are so positively received.