ACTIVISM – HK’s Slutwalk 2013 Protests Victim Blaming & Rape Myths 14


The Hong Kong chapter of a global movement against victim-blaming and rape culture hit the streets today, marching from Times Square to Wanchai…

Dozens of activists – both men and women, from all ages and backgrounds – joined together protesting such issues as HK’s flimsy rape laws and increased sexual assault figures in the city.

Dressed mostly in pyjamas, the activists chanted “Hey ho, hey ho! Rape myths have got to go!” and “I’m a slut, I’m a ho! No matter what, no means no.

Marchers, including members of the LGBT community, were escorted by over a dozen police officers. Passing bewildered onlookers, they shouted in Cantonese, “Don’t teach me how to dress. Teach rapists not to rape” and “I want sexual freedom, not sexual violence.”

The Slutwalk movement began in 2011 in Toronto, Canada, in response to to a local police officer who suggested that women ought “avoid dressing like sluts” to remain safe.

The misguided sentiment was echoed in May by HK’s Chief Security Officer, who asked that “young ladies not drink too much” to avoid rape. Lai Tung Kwok’s comments were widely reported, shooting him to international notoriety.

Weeks later, HK’s ex-Chief Prosecutor (now high court judge) Kevin Zervos infamously commented that victims of sexual assault should extend more sympathy to their attackers. Neither public figure apologised for their remarks, though Zervos threatened anyone reproducing his verbatim comments with legal action.

Last year’s HK Slutwalk attracted around 200 participants, who ‘over-dressed’ to emphasise that victims cannot be blamed for the crime, no mater how they choose to dress.

Attitudes which blame victims often excuse perpetrators and reduce the likelihood of prosecuting attackers.

Cases of rape have increased by 60% to 35 reported incidents in the first quarter of 2013.

Whilst these figures are already shocking, the SCMP reported in January that the true figure is probably vastly higher.

90% of sexual assault cases go unreported according to the Hong Kong Women’s Coalition on Equal Opportunities.

Shame, fear of condemnation and inaction by the authorities are to blame for the HK’s low rates of sexual assault reporting.

Click here for the HK Slutwalk Facebook page.

Last year’s gathering as reported by TVB’s Pip Stewart…

SvVAQf3.jpg (621×480)

See also: Time Out Magazine – Sexual Assault is Never OK.

Hong Kong’s LGBT community…

Archive of political posts and coverage…

The front lines (in reverse chronological order – most recent first)…

Rallies/Demonstrations attended by, or covered by, Hong Wrong…

Reinterpreting major local news events in English for foreign readers and expats…


  • Mike

    I don’t think that many people agree with the idea that dressing in any manor makes rape okay.

    On the other hand, there are things you can do to minimise crime. I wouldn’t walk in to die-hard Manchester United pub with my Leeds shirt on, because that would be stupid and I’d probably not walk out unharmed. I know that’s true, so I wouldn’t do it. I don’t protest about it even though there is an injustice at the heart of the story.

    Rape will always exist, and always be unjust and sad. That won’t ever change. Wearing provocative outfits is a choice that girls make knowing full well it will increase attention from preying men, including (no doubt) potential rapists. If they want to do that, then that’s okay, but they do it knowing they increase the chance of rape.

    It’s not a case of whether rape is right or wrong, or whether anyone deserves it. No-one deserves it, but one can minimise the chance of it by not doing things that will obviously attract luring men. Just like I won’t walk into a supporters Manchester pub during a Man U game wearing my (Leeds) united shirt. Because that would increase my chances of being killed. That’s just life, I’d be inviting trouble. I wouldn’t be to blame but perhaps I could have avoided it with some common sense.

    • Tom

      Your opinions are why people were protesting yesterday.

  • Guest

    I don’t think that many people agree with the idea that dressing in any manor makes rape okay.

    On the other hand, there are things you can do to minimise crime. I
    wouldn’t walk in to die-hard Manchester United pub with my Leeds shirt
    on, because that would be stupid and I’d probably not walk out unharmed.
    I know that’s true, so I wouldn’t do it. I don’t protest about it even
    though there is an injustice at the heart of the story.

    Rape will always exist, and always be unjust and sad. That won’t ever
    change. Wearing provocative outfits is a choice that girls make knowing
    full well it will increase attention from preying men, including (no
    doubt) potential rapists. If they want to do that, then that’s okay, but
    they do it knowing they increase the chance of rape.

    It’s not a case of whether rape is right or wrong, or whether anyone
    deserves it. No-one deserves it, but one can minimise the chance of it
    by not doing things that will obviously attract luring men. Just like I
    won’t walk into a supporters Manchester pub during a Man U game wearing
    my (Leeds) united shirt. Because that would increase my chances of being
    killed. That’s just life, I’d be inviting trouble. I wouldn’t be to
    blame but perhaps I could have avoided it with some common sense.

    • Guest

      Nice to see the Commies jumping on this too!

    • Tom

      Some of your opinions here are why people were protesting yesterday.

      • Mike

        That’s correct: but my question is, why is my argument invalid? I don’t disagree that people should not be raped under any circumstances – but I don’t think it’s unreasonable to face facts and admit that ones chances of being raped can be reduced with the correct attitudes. I don’t think that the victims should be blamed either.

        People may find this reality unacceptable, but it doesn’t stop it from being the current truth. By all means campaign for change, but complaining about people pointing out the current state-of-affairs in good faith isn’t going to help.

  • Guest

    I don’t think that many people agree with the idea that dressing in any manor makes rape okay.

    On the other hand, there are things you can do to minimise crime. I
    wouldn’t walk in to die-hard Manchester United pub with my Leeds shirt
    on, because that would be stupid and I’d probably not walk out unharmed.
    I know that’s true, so I wouldn’t do it. I don’t protest about it even
    though there is an injustice at the heart of the story.

    Rape will always exist, and always be unjust and sad. That won’t ever
    change. Wearing provocative outfits is a choice that girls make knowing
    full well it will increase attention from preying men, including (no
    doubt) potential rapists. If they want to do that, then that’s okay, but
    they do it knowing they increase the chance of rape.

    It’s not a case of whether rape is right or wrong, or whether anyone
    deserves it. No-one deserves it, but one can minimise the chance of it
    by not doing things that will obviously attract luring men. Just like I
    won’t walk into a supporters Manchester pub during a Man U game wearing
    my (Leeds) united shirt. Because that would increase my chances of being
    killed. That’s just life, I’d be inviting trouble. I wouldn’t be to
    blame but perhaps I could have avoided it with some common sense.

    • Guest

      Nice to see the Commies jumping on this too!

    • Tom

      Some of your opinions here are why people were protesting yesterday.

      • Mike

        That’s correct: but my question is, why is my argument invalid? I don’t disagree that people should not be raped under any circumstances – but I don’t think it’s unreasonable to face facts and admit that ones chances of being raped can be reduced with the correct attitudes. I don’t think that the victims should be blamed either.

        People may find this reality unacceptable, but it doesn’t stop it from being the current truth. By all means campaign for change, but complaining about people pointing out the current state-of-affairs in good faith isn’t going to help.

  • Jane Lam

    If you wouldn’t say it to a rape survivor’s face don’t say it online

  • Jane Lam

    If you wouldn’t say it to a rape survivor’s face don’t say it online

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  • Sarah

    ummmm, no. You can’t teach people not to rape. Plus rape is against the law and is not acceptable, But their will always be rapists, Just like their will always be thieves. You don’t put a sign in front of your house saying “don’t tell me to lock my doors, teach people not to steal.” No, you lock your doors and protect your house. Same here, protect yourself and quit living in this fantasy where rape, murder, and thief are things that won’t exist.